Oh my! Where to start…???!!!

Shall we start with garden law – what you are (and are not) permitted to do without applying for planning permission? That is an article all on its own – so check out some key points via the link below, or the planning portal of your local authority… A little time spent researching up-front can save costly mistakes!

http://www.letsgogardening.co.uk/garden_law.htm

Once you have decided the ground rules, or have decided to apply for planning permission if it is required, you can turn your attention to the design of the fence. Think about its purpose. Fences may (generally) define or mark boundaries but they can also fulfil a whole host of other purposes. They can be visually porous or closed to give views, privacy or security, they can give shelter to plants and create microclimates depending on height and porosity, they can be designed to allow certain wildlife to pass through or under them. Aesthetic can be whatever you want it to be! Plain or decorative, traditional or contemporary. There is a wide range of material choices now – fences don’t have to be timber and when they are timber do you want to paint or stain them as the finish (eg. planed or rough cut) can often determine what treatment they will take.  Fences can be easy or difficult to maintain or (virtually) maintenance free, be expensive or cheap, simple or difficult (and therefore more costly) to install. Associated features like posts and gravel boards and fixing methods all need to be considered as they can seriously affect the look of the fence. Unless you are intending to make a feature out of the fence, keeping it simple, without fancy shapes to the top of the panels or trellis, or difficult-to-stain profiles to the timber.

Here are our top ‘Do's' of garden fencing:

 

Do: Find out what laws apply to your circumstances and if planning permission is required.

Do: Paint in concrete posts and gravel boards with matching masonry paint to match your fence stain for a harmonious, uniform finish that ‘disappears’ and sets off adjacent planting.  If you want your fence to just weather to a silver grey over time, don’t use concrete posts – use timber that will weather uniformly with the panels

 

Do: paint in the masonry…! Source: Turning Leaf Garden Designs

Aaahhh… that’s better! Source: Turning Leaf Garden Designs

 

Do: Consider a ‘hit and miss’ style fence to enable access for garden wildlife.

Source: Buyfencingdirect.co.uk

 

Do: Keep fences in good repair – ‘Good fences make good neighbours’ (Robert Frost).

Do:  Consider all the various styles and types of fencing on the market – fencing doesn’t have to be boring!

A non-boring fence! Source: Houzz

….and another! Source: Lushome

 

The possibilities for pattern and style are endless... Source: Houzz

 

                                             - Written by Karolyn Mowll Director - BSc(Hons), MSGD, Cert Arb L4(ABC)

If you would like help realising the full potential of your garden we provide a full range of services: ‘Design, Build, Maintain’ so don’t hesitate to contact us! Alternatively for more professional advice on garden maintenance and design tips keep following our blog.

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